• Funding, Grants, Awards, and Fellowships

    IPIR attempts to list open and current funding, grants, awards, and fellowships for indigenous peoples, or those related to indigenous issues. All listings provided are currently open and seeking applications. Closing dates are clearly indicated for each listing. To list a grant, fellowship, or award, simply email the This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

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    1
  • Conferences & Workshops

    IPIR attempts to list open and current calls for papers or participation in conferences and workshops for indigenous peoples, or those related to indigenous issues. All listings provided are currently open and seeking applications. Closing dates are clearly indicated for each listing. To list a grant, fellowship, or award, simply email the This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

    Article Count:
    2
  • Weekly News

    Indigenous news from around the world. Every week IPIR publishes five key news items on indigenous peoples’ issues. These news summaries highlight key items published by IPIR from the previous week: declarations, articles, statements, reports, and more.

    Article Count:
    222
  • Book Review Information
    Article Count:
    5
  • Videos, Movies, and Audio Recordings
    Article Count:
    814
  • Journals
    Journals that Focus on Indigenous Peoples
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    2
  • Indigenous Peoples
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    2
    • North America Indigenous Peoples

      NorthAmerica MapNorth America has an area of 19,614,056 square kilometers (7,573,029 sq mi) and a population of 344,002,520 as of 2010. North America includes two independent countries – the United States and Canada. Indigenous people have inhabited all parts of North America for at least 12,000 years, and prior to European colonization was home to several highly sophisticated civilizations. Today there are approximately 5.2 million people in the U.S., or 1.7%, identified as Native American in combination with another ethnic identity and about 2.9 million, or 0.9%, identified only as Native American, Alaska Native, or Native Hawaiian. There are currently 565 federally recognized tribes in the United States, as well as several other tribes who are not federally recognized. In Canada indigenous people total 1,172,790, about 3.6% of the total population. First Nations are a diverse group of 698,025 people, representing more than 630 recognized nations and more than 60 languages. The Metis constitute a distinct group numbering 389,785, while the Inuit number 51,158 and the majority of whom live in 53 Arctic communities in four Land Claims regions: Nunatsiavut (Labrador); Nunavik (Quebec); Nunavut; and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region of the Northwest Territories. Like their indigenous brothers and sisters, they face a number of common struggles: sovereignty, the right to self-determination, preservation of language and heritage, rights to land and natural resources, impacts from climate change and environmental damage, and recognition within local, federal, and international governments and laws.

      Article Count:
      4250
    • Central Asia Indigenous Peoples

      CentralAsia MapCentral Asia is the core region of the Asian continent and stretches from the Caspian Sea in the west to China in the east, covering an area of 5,130,746 square kilometers (1,980,992 sq mi). With a population of 1,600,000,000 people, Central Asia includes seven countries – Sri Lanka, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Across this vast region, indigenous peoples – often called Tribals, Adivasis, or Dalits – have lived for thousands and thousands of years. In Bangladesh there are over 50 tribal groups, most of whom are located in the Chittagong Hill Tracts in the southeast, while in India, there are over 200 recognized tribal groups (as well as many unrecognized tribal groups). Pakistan, Nepal, Sri Lanka, and Bhutan also have large indigenous populations, although they are often referred to as ethnic minorities. Like their indigenous brothers and sisters, they face a number of common struggles: sovereignty, the right to self-determination, preservation of language and heritage, rights to land and natural resources, impacts from climate change and environmental damage, and recognition within local, federal, and international governments and laws.

      Article Count:
      1000
    • Southeast Asia Indigenous Peoples

      Southeast Asia MapSoutheast Asia is a vast area spanning some 35 degrees of latitude and 50 degrees of longitude. Often designated as a sub-region of Asia consisting of the countries that are geographically south of China, east of India, west of New Guinea and north of Australia, the areas 11 countries include four of the world’s 20 most populous – Indonesia, Philippines, Vietnam, and Thailand – and as a whole is home to about 8 percent of the world’s population. Countries located within Southeast Asia include: Burma (Myanmar), Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, Philippines, East Timor, and Brunei. Within this large and diverse area, indigenous people have lived and resided dating back to the beginning of modern humankind, when Homo sapiens first reached the region by around 45,000 years ago, having moved eastward from the Indian subcontinent. Today there are hundreds of distinct, culturally diverse indigenous groups in Southeast Asia, including the Akha, Degar, Hmong, Karen, Lahu, Karbi, Lisu, Orang Asli, Bajau, Dayak, Igorot, Lumad, Mangyan, Palawan, Penan, and others. Together indigenous people in Southeast Asia, like their indigenous brothers and sisters elsewhere, face a number of common struggles: sovereignty, the right to self-determination, preservation of language and heritage, rights to land and natural resources, impacts from climate change and environmental damage, and recognition within local, federal, and international governments and laws.

      Article Count:
      1262
    • Asia Indigenous Peoples

      Asia MapAsia covers about 12,000,000 square kilometers (4,600,000 sq mi) and contains about 22% (1.5 billion) of all the people in the world. Seven independent countries are located in Asia – China, Hong Kong, Japan, Macau, Mongolia, North Korea, South Korea, and Taiwan. Across this vast region indigenous peoples – often termed ethnic minorities – have lived for thousands and thousands of years. Today, some peoples and groups have been officially recognized, while others continue to fight for recognition. In China, 56 distinct ethnic groups have been recognized, including Han, Zhuang, Manchu, Hui, Miao, Uyghur, and Tujia, while in Taiwan, only 14 indigenous groups have been recognized – Ami, Atayal, Bunun, Kavalan, Paiwan, Puyuma, Rukai, Saisiyat, Sakizaya, Sediq, Thao, Truku, Tsou, and Yami. In Japan, the Yamato, Ainu, and Ryukyuan continue to fight for recognition, while in Mongolia the Khalkha, Oirat, Buryat, Kazakhs, Tuvans, and others are recognized as ethnic Mongols. Today, like their indigenous brothers and sisters, the indigenous people of Asia face a number of common struggles: sovereignty, the right to self-determination, preservation of language and heritage, rights to land and natural resources, impacts from climate change and environmental damage, and recognition within local, federal, and international governments and laws.

      Article Count:
      212
    • Central American and Caribbean Indigenous Peoples

      CentralAmerica MapCentral America and the Caribbean has an area of 2,716,997 square kilometers (1,048,932 sq mi) and a combined population of 194,452,034 people. The region consists of 21 independent states - Mexico, Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Puerto Rico, and the island states of the Lesser Antilles – as well as fourteen non-sovereign territories. For at least 15,000 years before European colonization began in the late 15th century, Central America and the Caribbean was inhabited by indigenous people who belonged to one or more of roughly 30 language groups. However, shortly after European colonization indigenous people rapidly declined as a result of disease, government policies, destruction of traditional lifeways, and other actions. Today, the indigenous people of Central America and the Caribbean comprise approximately 8% (17 million) of the total population. Like their indigenous brothers and sisters, they face a number of common struggles: sovereignty, the right to self-determination, preservation of language and heritage, rights to land and natural resources, impacts from climate change and environmental damage, and recognition within local, federal, and international governments and laws.

      Article Count:
      829
    • Middle East Indigenous Peoples

      MiddleEast MapThe Middle East is a region that encompasses Western Asia and all of the Arabian Peninsula. Consisting of an area over 6,255,160 square kilometers (2,415,131 sq mi) and a population over 313,428,000, the Middle East includes twenty independent countries – Turkey, Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Yemen, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Iraq, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine, Syria, Iran, Cyprus, and part of Egypt. Today the Middle East is home to several indigenous and ethnic groups, including: Arabs, Turks, Persians, Jews/Israelis, Kurds, Assyrians (Chaldo-Assyrians), Arameans-Syriacs, Egyptian Copts, Armenians, Azeris, Maltese, Circassians, Greeks, Turcomans, Shabaks, Yazidis, Mandeans, Georgians, Roma, Gagauz, Mhallami, and Samaritans. Like their indigenous brothers and sisters, they face a number of common struggles: sovereignty, the right to self-determination, preservation of language and heritage, rights to land and natural resources, impacts from climate change and environmental damage, and recognition within local, federal, and international governments and laws.

      Article Count:
      38
    • Pacific-Oceania Indigenous Peoples

      Oceania MapThe Pacific-Oceania is a vast region centered around the islands of the tropical Pacific Ocean. Encompassing an area of 918,786 square kilometers (354,745 sq mi), the Pacific-Oceania region contains thirteen independent countries – Fiji, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Nauru, New Zealand, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu – as well as 25 dependencies. Across this region, over 25 indigenous languages are officially recognized among a total population of 12,886,945. For over 4,000 years indigenous people have inhabited the islands of Pacific-Oceania, and prior to colonization in the 18th and 19th centuries consisted of several soverign indigenous groups and nations. Today, like their indigenous brothers and sisters, the indigenous people of Pacific-Oceania face a number of common struggles: sovereignty, the right to self-determination, preservation of language and heritage, rights to land and natural resources, impacts from climate change and environmental damage, and recognition within local, federal, and international governments and laws.

      Article Count:
      646
    • Greenland Indigenous Peoples

      Greenland MapGreenland is the world's largest island by area (2,166,086 square kilometers or 836,330 sq mi) and has a population of 56,749, making it the least densely populated dependency or country in the world. Inhabited by Arctic indigenous peoples via Canada for at least 4,500 to 5,000 years, today Kalaallit or Greenlandic Inuit make up 88% of the population. Like their indigenous brothers and sisters, they face a number of common struggles: sovereignty, the right to self-determination, preservation of language and heritage, rights to land and natural resources, impacts from climate change and environmental damage, and recognition within local, federal, and international governments and laws.

      Article Count:
      5
    • Europe Indigenous Peoples

      RussiaEurope MapEurope and Russia cover about 26,010,374 square kilometers (10,042,661 sq mi) and contain a population of 773,562,537 people. The region includes 50 independent countries, including those within the European Union, Russia, as well as those that were part of the former Soviet Union. Across this vast region indigenous peoples have lived for thousands and thousands of years. In some countries, indigenous peoples have been officially recognized, such as the Saami in Norway and Finland, but in other countries they are only recognized as ethnic minorities. Other countries, such as Russia, officially recognizes only 41 distinct indigenous groups out of 160 ethnic groups within its borders. Most other countries in Europe and Russia do not recognize indigenous peoples, but instead designate some groups as “ethnic minorities.” Today, like their indigenous brothers and sisters, the indigenous people of Europe and Russia face a number of common struggles: sovereignty, the right to self-determination, preservation of language and heritage, rights to land and natural resources, impacts from climate change and environmental damage, and recognition within local, federal, and international governments and laws.

      Article Count:
      328
    • Africa Indigenous Peoples

      Africa MapAfrica is the world's second-largest and second-most-populous continent. At about 30.2 million km² (11.7 million sq mi) including adjacent islands, it covers six percent of the Earth's total surface area and 20.4 percent of the total land area. It has 54 fully recognized sovereign states, 9 territories and three de facto states with limited recognition. The indigenous people of Africa are those people of Africa whose way of life, attachment or claims to particular lands, and social and political standing in relation to other more dominant groups have resulted in their substantial marginalisation within modern African states. Indigenous people of Africa include the Amazigh (or Imazighn) of North Africa, commonly know as the Berbers; the Ogiek, Sengwer, Dahalo – Aweer – Waata, Elmolo, Yaaku, Maasai, Samburu, Rendille, Pokot, Pokomo, Borana, Hadzabe, Dorobo and others of East Africa; the Batwa, Bambuti, and others of Central Africa; the Dinka, Nuer, Afar, Boranna, Karamajong, Mbororo, Tuareg, and others of the Horn of Africa; the San, Khoekhoe, Nama, and others of South Africa; and Bororo, Tuareg, Tubu, and others of West Africa. Like their indigenous brothers and sisters, they face a number of common struggles: sovereignty, the right to self-determination, preservation of language and heritage, rights to land and natural resources, impacts from climate change and environmental damage, and recognition within local, federal, and international governments and laws.

      Article Count:
      756
    • Australia Indigenous Peoples

      Australia MapAustralia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island of Tasmania, and numerous smaller islands. It is the world's sixth-largest country by total area. For at least 40,000 years before European colonization in the late 18th century, Australia was inhabited by indigenous people who belonged to one or more of roughly 250 language groups. Traditionally most indigenous Australians were hunter-gatherers, with a complex oral culture and spiritual values based on reverence for the land and a belief in the Dreamtime. The indigenous population, estimated at 750,000 to 1,000,000 at the time of European colonization, rapidly declined as a result of disease, government policies, destruction of traditional lifeways, and other actions. Today, the indigenous people of Australia – commonly referred to as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders – comprise 2.3% of the total population. Like their indigenous brothers and sisters, they face a number of common struggles: sovereignty, the right to self-determination, preservation of language and heritage, rights to land and natural resources, impacts from climate change and environmental damage, and recognition within local, federal, and international governments and laws.

      Article Count:
      2093
    • South America Indigenous Peoples

      SouthAmerica MapSouth America has an area of 17,840,000 square kilometers (6,890,000 sq mi) and a population as of 2005 of more than 371,090,000. South America ranks fourth in total area and fifth in world population. It includes twelve independent countries—Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Suriname, Uruguay, and Venezuela—as well as French Guiana, which is an overseas region of France and the Falkland Islands of the UK. Indigenous people have inhabited parts of South America for at least 12,000 years, and prior to European colonization was home to several highly sophisticated civilizations. Today, there are hundreds of indigenous groups struggling for survival in South America, from the Yanomami of Venezuela and Brazil to the Mapuche of Chile and Argentina to the Achuar of Ecuador and Peru. Combined, it is estimated that there are over 21 million indigenous people from over 400 broadly defined indigenous groups. Like their indigenous brothers and sisters, they face a number of common struggles: sovereignty, the right to self-determination, preservation of language and heritage, rights to land and natural resources, impacts from climate change and environmental damage, and recognition within local, federal, and international governments and laws.

      Article Count:
      2244
    • Indigenous Peoples General
      Article Count:
      994
  • Books
    Books Section
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    0
  • Uncategorised
    Article Count:
    8
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